Learning to Write, Again (Poem by Ratandeep S. Singh)

annmarcaida:

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See I am at it again -
intently considering how to pluck assorted fragrances,
weaving them into a garland
and making the stock loveable.
I’m not sitting by the brook
or under coniferous shade;
still I’ve enough light around me
to assist in my pursuit.
Yes, I’ve a pen too, with blue…

A nightcap

Art and Earth: A Boat, the Moon, and Some Ghosts (A Fairy Tale by Mona Dunn)

annmarcaida:

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It was a small wooden boat, a dory that had been painted red a long time ago. And if you looked real hard, you could see what remained of a sky blue stripe studded with little yellow polka dots at the water line. It held her weight, balanced nicely, and only felt tippy when the wind blew hard…

I’ve always resisted the idea of fiction as comfort. Instead, I’ve always insisted to myself and to other people, that in order to be good, fiction must be a disruptive force, that the best stories are ones that shake us out of complacency, period. Though this remains a bedrock belief, I have to admit that there have been mornings lately when I have also looked to fiction to provide a kind of solace as well, when reality (whatever this is) is a little more than I can take. When only fiction can help me make sense of things. You know what I mean.

The Heart of Summer

If its never too late to start early and time is relative then I’m right in the groove.
more…

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The Heart of Summer

If its never too late to start early and time is relative then I’m right in the groove.

more…

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June

Such thoughtful, well written wonder, read quite happily from the other side of the far northern latitude.

oldloves:

Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:
“Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know. And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”
- from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live

This touches an electric cord in my central nervous system. My beautiful daughter and her new baby return home this weekend after a second winter of cancer treatments. We’ll be throwing each of them over our shoulders and running about like crazed chickens, saying hello, never wanting the goodbyes to come.

oldloves:

Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:

“Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.

So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”

We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know. 

And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.

It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”

- from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live

This touches an electric cord in my central nervous system. My beautiful daughter and her new baby return home this weekend after a second winter of cancer treatments. We’ll be throwing each of them over our shoulders and running about like crazed chickens, saying hello, never wanting the goodbyes to come.

millionsmillions:

Back in 2008, Patti Smith kicked off an exhibition with a reading of Virginia Woolf’s The Waves. It may not surprise you to learn that the punk legend, after getting through one sentence, broke into “free improvisation.”

Two necessary anchors in my life

Art and Earth: Restoring the Garden of Eden

annmarcaida:

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As a child, Azzam Alwash loved to visit Iraq’s Southern Marshes with his father, a hydraulic engineer under Saddam Hussein. This huge, diverse ecosystem, larger than the Florida Everglades, is believed by Biblical and Qu’ran scholars to be the site of The Garden of Eden. Alwash describes the…

This is a wonderful look into our often dreadful effects on the planet. Thank you, Ann.